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A Taliban commander released from the Guantanamo Bay prison by former President Barack Obama masterminded the takeover of Kabul, it was reported.

Khairullah Khairkhwa, arrested after the 9/11 terrorist attacks, was held at Guantanamo Bay from 2002-14 after Pentagon officials accused him of ​​being a close associate of Osama bin Laden and was deemed too dangerous to be released, the New York Post reported Monday night.

Khairkhwa was released in exchange for an American deserter, who later was court-martialed. At the time of the 2014 release, Obama assured the public that Khairkhwa and four other enemy combatants would be transferred to Qatar and kept from causing any trouble in Afghanistan.

However, the freed detainees quickly used Qatar as a base to form a regime in exile.

In fact, members of the Taliban Five were recognized by Western diplomats as official representatives of the movement during recent “peace” talks, the Post said. Khairkhwa actually sat across the table from President Joe Biden’s envoy to Afghanistan, Zalmay Khalilzad, in Moscow.

Khairkhwa was part of the official Taliban delegation that negotiated the final terms of the U.S. withdrawal.

“I started jihad to remove foreign forces from my country and establish an Islamic government, and jihad will continue until we reach that goal through a political agreement,” Khairkhwa said at the summit.

Taliban fighters told Al Jazeera they were arranging to bring back their leadership from Qatar upon securing the Kabul, the capital city of Afghanistan.

Taliban co-founder Abdul Ghani Baradar Akhund, among prisoners released by the Afghan government as a result of the February 2020 peace deal signed by the Trump administration and the Taliban, on Tuesday returned to Afghanistan for the first time in nearly 20 years, Yahoo News reported Wednesday.

One Taliban member, who claimed he had been detained at Guantanamo Bay, slammed America for “oppressing our people for 20 years.”

Khairkhwa earlier this year assured the administration the Taliban would not launch a spring military offensive if Biden committed to removing all remaining U.S. troops. He also promised not to retaliate against any Afghans who worked with the U.S. military or the U.S.-backed government in Kabul.

Reports coming out of Afghanistan indicated the Taliban were going door to door to punish their enemies and people who cooperated with Westerners.

Khairkhwa previously has overseen beheadings and stonings while instated as the Taliban’s interior minister, the Daily Mail reported.

Obama released Khairkhwa and four other combatants in exchange for the Taliban releasing U.S. Army Sgt. Robert Bergdahl, who was captured after deserting his post in Afghanistan.

Obama celebrated Bergdahl as a heroic “POW,” but the soldier ultimately was court-martialed and pleaded guilty to desertion and misbehavior before the enemy after the facts of his disappearance and capture became known.

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White House to send more than $300 million in aid to Afghanistan despite Taliban control

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The White House announced plans Tuesday to send more than $308 million in humanitarian assistance to Afghanistan as millions face starvation under the new Taliban government following President Joe Biden’s withdrawal.

The assistance would be given by the United States Agency for International Development through “independent humanitarian organizations” to the Afghan people, National Security Council spokesperson Emily Horne said.

The administration has been criticized for sending aid to Afghanistan previously. Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.) warned that it would be “foolish” and asserted that the Taliban “would take the money.” 

“This brings total U.S. humanitarian aid in Afghanistan and for Afghan refugees in the region to nearly $782 million since October 2021, and we remain the single largest donor of humanitarian aid in Afghanistan,” Horne said, adding that the U.S. has also given 4.3 million COVID-19 doses to the Afghan people.

Assistance will “help provide lifesaving protection and shelter, essential health care, winterization assistance, emergency food aid, water, sanitation, and hygiene services in response to the growing humanitarian needs exacerbated by COVID-19 and healthcare shortages, drought, malnutrition, and the winter season,” Horne said.

China sent assistance to Afghanistan last month to help the nation prepare for winter and build ties between the Chinese Communist Party and the new jihadist government. 

“The United States is committed to supporting the Afghan people and we continue to consider all options available to us,” Horne concluded. “We stand with the people of Afghanistan.”

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ARTICLE: Fort Hood soldier found dead behind barracks

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The soldier was identified as Spc. Maxwell Hockin, who was assigned to 1st Armored Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division. He entered the Army in March 2017 as a combat engineer, Fort Hood officials said Wednesday.

Hockin’s awards and decorations include the Army Good Conduct Medal, Global War on Terrorism Medal, National Defense Service Medal and the Army Service Ribbon, officials said.

Hockin had been at the Texas base since July 2017, where he was assigned to the 91st Engineer Battalion.

Traffic flows through the main gate past a welcome sign, July 9, 2013, in Fort Hood, Texas.

“The entire Saber family is devastated by the loss of our true teammate and friend Specialist Maxwell Hockin,” Lt. Col. Patrick Sullivan, commander, 91st Engineer Battalion, said in a statement Wednesday. “He had an outstanding work ethic, was a mentor to his peers, and was always willing to help out the team. He will truly be missed. Our thoughts and our prayers are with Maxwell’s family during this difficult time.”

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https://www.kcentv.com/embeds/video/500-c28aef5b-069b-455b-a8a9-4a765fa4a913/iframe

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VIDEOS: How many Americans are still in Afghanistan?

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A good question How many American are still in Afghanistan… those who should know don’t.

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