Connect with us

Published

on

Sen. Marsha Blackburn (R-TN), one of the several Republican lawmakers who signed a letter to President Biden demanding answers on the botched withdrawal from Afghanistan, said the president has done more for the Taliban and China than American families during his presidency.

“Joe Biden has done more for the Taliban and the Chinese Communist Party than he has for American families,” Blackburn observed in a Wednesday social media post, adding that Biden’s “weak leadership” has “created a crisis in Afghanistan and a crisis at the southern border”:

Joe Biden has done more for the Taliban and the Chinese Communist Party than he has for American families.

— Sen. Marsha Blackburn (@MarshaBlackburn) September 2, 2021

Joe Biden’s weak leadership has created a crisis in Afghanistan and a crisis at the southern border.

— Sen. Marsha Blackburn (@MarshaBlackburn) September 2, 2021

Blackburn, a prominent critic of Biden, particularly following his administration’s disastrous withdrawal from Afghanistan where they abided by the Taliban-approved August 31 deadline, is among several GOP lawmakers who signed a letter demanding the Biden administration provide answers about the botched withdrawal from Afghanistan and the humanitarian crisis created, including information on the number of Americans left behind and the vetting process used for evacuees being brought into the United States.

“We write regarding the humanitarian crisis created by your withdrawal of the United States from Afghanistan, and the safety and well-being of our fellow countrymen and allies who you left behind,” the September 2 letter addressed to Biden read.

“The signatories of this letter may have differing opinions about whether the United States should have maintained a military presence in Afghanistan, but we all agree that the arbitrary and poorly-planned method by which you withdrew from Afghanistan caused this crisis,” they wrote, identifying their “immediate priority” as the safety of American citizens, permanent residents, and allies left behind by Biden’s administration in Afghanistan.

“We are also concerned by reports that ineligible individuals, including Afghans with ties to terrorist organizations or serious, violent criminals, were evacuated alongside innocent refugee families,” they continued, requesting answers to a series of questions no later than Tuesday, September 7, at 5 p.m.

President Joe Biden pauses as he speaks about the bombings at the Kabul airport that killed at least 12 U.S. service members, from the East Room of the White House, Thursday, Aug. 26, 2021, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

The senators posed four main questions, although each has a series of follow-up questions. The main questions include:

  • How many American citizens does the administration believe to remain in Afghanistan?
  • How many green-card holders does the administration believe to remain in Afghanistan?
  • How many Special Immigrant Visa (SIV) applicants remain in Afghanistan?
  • According to your administration, more than 50% of evacuated Afghans were not SIV applicants or their families, including vulnerable Afghans such as women and girls at high risk for Taliban reprisals. Of the more than 57,000 Afghans who are not American citizens, green-card holders, or SIV applicants or their families, how many had no pending immigration application or status with the United States prior to being airlifted?

The lawmakers requested unclassified answers that can be made available to the public, as Americans “need to see that the United States will not abandon them to terrorists abroad forever.”

“If your answers implicate classified material, you may also submit a classified appendix to your answers and coordinate with us to provide a classified briefing,” they added.

Signers include Republican Sens. Blackburn, Tom Cotton (AR), Ted Cruz (TX), John Boozman (AR), Mike Braun (IN), Susan Collins (ME), Kevin Cramer (ND), Steve Daines (MT), Joni Ernst (IA), Deb Fischer (NE), Lindsey Graham (SC), Chuck Grassley (IA), Josh Hawley (MO), Cindy Hyde-Smith (MS), Ron Johnson (WI), John Kennedy (LA), Mike Lee (UT), Cynthia Lummis (WY), Roger Marshall (KS), Jerry Moran (KS), Ben Sasse (NE), John Thun (SD), Pat Toomey (PA), Tommy Tuberville (AL), and Roger Wicker (MS).

Advertisement

afghanistan

White House to send more than $300 million in aid to Afghanistan despite Taliban control

Published

on

The White House announced plans Tuesday to send more than $308 million in humanitarian assistance to Afghanistan as millions face starvation under the new Taliban government following President Joe Biden’s withdrawal.

The assistance would be given by the United States Agency for International Development through “independent humanitarian organizations” to the Afghan people, National Security Council spokesperson Emily Horne said.

The administration has been criticized for sending aid to Afghanistan previously. Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.) warned that it would be “foolish” and asserted that the Taliban “would take the money.” 

“This brings total U.S. humanitarian aid in Afghanistan and for Afghan refugees in the region to nearly $782 million since October 2021, and we remain the single largest donor of humanitarian aid in Afghanistan,” Horne said, adding that the U.S. has also given 4.3 million COVID-19 doses to the Afghan people.

Assistance will “help provide lifesaving protection and shelter, essential health care, winterization assistance, emergency food aid, water, sanitation, and hygiene services in response to the growing humanitarian needs exacerbated by COVID-19 and healthcare shortages, drought, malnutrition, and the winter season,” Horne said.

China sent assistance to Afghanistan last month to help the nation prepare for winter and build ties between the Chinese Communist Party and the new jihadist government. 

“The United States is committed to supporting the Afghan people and we continue to consider all options available to us,” Horne concluded. “We stand with the people of Afghanistan.”

Advertisement
Continue Reading

afghanistan

ARTICLE: Fort Hood soldier found dead behind barracks

Published

on

By

The soldier was identified as Spc. Maxwell Hockin, who was assigned to 1st Armored Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division. He entered the Army in March 2017 as a combat engineer, Fort Hood officials said Wednesday.

Hockin’s awards and decorations include the Army Good Conduct Medal, Global War on Terrorism Medal, National Defense Service Medal and the Army Service Ribbon, officials said.

Hockin had been at the Texas base since July 2017, where he was assigned to the 91st Engineer Battalion.

Traffic flows through the main gate past a welcome sign, July 9, 2013, in Fort Hood, Texas.

“The entire Saber family is devastated by the loss of our true teammate and friend Specialist Maxwell Hockin,” Lt. Col. Patrick Sullivan, commander, 91st Engineer Battalion, said in a statement Wednesday. “He had an outstanding work ethic, was a mentor to his peers, and was always willing to help out the team. He will truly be missed. Our thoughts and our prayers are with Maxwell’s family during this difficult time.”

See the video:

https://www.kcentv.com/embeds/video/500-c28aef5b-069b-455b-a8a9-4a765fa4a913/iframe

Advertisement
Continue Reading

afghanistan

VIDEOS: How many Americans are still in Afghanistan?

Published

on

By

A good question How many American are still in Afghanistan… those who should know don’t.

Advertisement
Continue Reading
Advertisement

Trending

Trending

Back