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Back at the beginning of her combat sports career, 20-year-old Holly Holm figured she wouldn’t want to still be fighting at 30.

“I pictured myself having kids doing the whole mom thing,” Holm told The Post over the phone on Wednesday. “Not that you can’t be a mom and fight. I just know, for me at the time, I thought, ‘Oh, maybe I want to be more involved as a mom, not be fighting anymore, going into training camps.’ ”

Holm (14-5, eight finishes) couldn’t have imagined at the time she’d be 40 years old, competing at the highest level — let alone in MMA rather than her first sports: boxing and kickboxing. And yet, here she is, set to headline Saturday’s UFC Fight Night (7 p.m. ET, ESPN+) against fellow bantamweight Ketlen Vieira.

Clearly, she adjusted expectations for her career as she went. Racking up welterweight boxing titles left and right by her mid 20s, “there was no way I was gonna retire when I was 30,” she recalls. Thirty came, and 35 became the new “for sure” end point in her mind. Once 35 came: “No way.”

“And I really thought 40 might be closer to the end, but it’s not,” Holm says. “I still feel great, and I feel my last fight is a fight [in which] I showed I’m still evolving. And it’s exciting to me, so I don’t want to stop now.”

Holly Holm
Holly Holm
Zuffa LLC via Getty Images

True enough, Holm’s last appearance was an eye opener. Back in October 2020, the former champion who had knocked the 135-pound crown from Ronda Rousey’s head with a high kick knockout earned a dominant five-round decision against Irene Aldana. 

But that was 19 months ago. Originally to return against Julianna Pena, Holm withdrew due to a cited diagnosis of hydronephrosis, a condition that causes swelling in the kidneys. A return at featherweight was planned against Norma Dumont for last October, but she once again was forced to pull out.

The second withdrawal was due to an issue with her knee, which she downplayed as nothing “extensive.” 

“A lot of people wondered how bad is my knee and things like that,” Holm said. “But I don’t think people realize my biggest injury was when I was 16. And that’s what caused a lot of problems. I’ve been able to go my whole career and people not really know about it. But it kind of caught up a little bit, and so I needed to give it a little extra rest this time. And now, it’s ready to rock and roll.”

When she rocks and rolls this weekend at UFC Apex in Las Vegas, she’ll do so after taking the longest break from competition of her 20-year pro fighting career — boxing from 2000-13, MMA since 2011, with kickboxing sprinkled in.

It wasn’t ideal, being away from what she calls her “passion,” but Holm found several silver linings. She enjoyed the process of remodeling a recently-purchased home, something she believed would have been a challenge in the middle of a fight camp. After knee surgery, she spent two weeks enjoying rare quality time with her mother, watching movies and drinking coffee. A trip to Nashville and some dancing there was a highlight.

Most noteworthy for fight fans since Holm last competed was her announcement as an upcoming inductee into the International Boxing Hall of Fame, which she considers “one of the biggest compliments” for her work in the ring, an honor that understandably exceeds several others she’s received throughout her career.

“I’m always humbled and blessed with any of them, but there is something different about the Boxing Hall of Fame,” Holm said. “That’s not just statewide; that’s worldwide. It’s the best fighters in the world. It’s not just females; it’s all of them. To be able to have my name recognized among household names like Muhammad Ali and Mike Tyson and Floyd Mayweather, it’s very surreal.”

Enshrinement comes next month, but Holm has more pressing business ahead of her as she faces Vieira (12-2, six finishes), who just earned a decision over Miesha Tate — the woman who took Holm’s title from her six years ago. The matchup carries title implications, with the winner seemingly the only viable challenger after champion Pena’s rematch against Amanda Nunes, the all-time great who lost to Pena in December and still reigns as the UFC featherweight titleholder.

Holm understands the stakes, and she sees Vieira as a real test for her in the cage.

“I think that she is, stylistically, one of the toughest bouts for me, outside of fighting for the championship,” Holm said. “There’s only a couple girls in front of me — you know who they are — and I feel like, outside of that, I think Ketlen is really the toughest opponent for me. 

“I’m really excited, actually, for this challenge. I knew that her and I would eventually meet at some point to fight, so here we are.”

All this, two decades after she figured one probably would be too much. And Holm sees nothing slowing her down in the years to come. Few women have competed at the highest level of MMA into their 40s, although there’s precedent on the men’s side. Randy Couture was the UFC heavyweight champion at 45. Reigning light heavyweight champion Glover Teixeira will make his first title defense next month at age 42.

Can Holm, like them, compete several years into her 40s?

“I just might,” she said.


By: Ny Post

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Kourtney Kardashian uses Kopari Coconut Melt to ‘look good naked’

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Page Six may be compensated and/or receive an affiliate commission if you buy through our links.

Kourtney Kardashian’s no stranger to showing skin.

Whether the reality star’s modeling lingerie, baring it all in a bikini or packing on PDA with husband Travis Barker, she’s clearly confident about her body — and relies on a selection of tried-and-true products to keep her skin in tip-top shape.

In one of her first-ever Poosh stories, fittingly titled “How to Look Good Naked,” the 43-year-old outlines some of her body care essentials, including La Mer The Body Crème ($300), Dr. Barbara Sturm Anti-Aging Body Cream ($95) and Le Labo’s Pin 12 Candle ($82) — the latter because “lighting is everything.”

But not everything on Kardashian’s list will bust your budget. She also swears by Kopari Organic Coconut Melt, which will set you back just $29 for a full-sized jar or $18 for a mini version.

“In order to achieve glowy skin, it’s important to moisturize everything — everywhere — at least once a day,” the Poosh piece reads. “Don’t forget to care for your hands and feet as well; we recommend focusing on these areas at night.”

Billed as “a deep conditioner for your bod,” the product is comprised of 100% organic, unrefined coconut oil, and Kopari suggests applying it “as soon as you step out of the shower and at the end of the day.”

What’s more, the multitasking product also works well as a hair mask, dry shave oil, bath mix-in and belly balm, per the brand.

Snag a tub for yourself below — and get ready to look fabulous in your birthday suit, too.

Kopari Organic Coconut melt
Kopari


By: Ny Post

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Carlos Carrasco’s gem, three homers propel Mets past Marlins

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MIAMI — He’s one tough Cookie these days.

Carlos Carrasco isn’t going to win any contests blowing away hitters, but the right-hander’s offspeed pitches and command — and most importantly, his health — have converged this season to give the Mets an invaluable rotation piece.

On Saturday, he gave his team 7 ²/₃ shutout innings in a 4-0 victory over the Marlins at loanDepot park. Carrasco extended his scoreless streak over his past three starts to 18 ²/₃ innings.

The win was No. 100 in Carrasco’s career, making the 35-year-old the eighth Venezuelan-born pitcher to reach the milestone. Carrasco last surrendered a run on July 9 against the Marlins at Citi Field.

The Mets (63-37) won their fifth straight and reached the 100-game mark with the franchise’s most victories since 1986.

Overall, Carrasco allowed four hits and struck out seven with two walks. Seth Lugo replaced Carrasco in the eighth inning after Charles Leblanc had doubled with two outs. But Leblanc was picked off second base by Tomas Nido, ensuring Carrasco’s scoreless streak continued.

Carlos Carrasco didn't allow a run in the Mets' 4-0 win over the Marlins.
Carlos Carrasco didn’t allow a run in the Mets’ 4-0 win over the Marlins.
AP

Lugo remained in the game to pitch a scoreless ninth inning, allowing Edwin Diaz a day off following a 10-pitch outing Friday in which he struck out the side.

The Mets will try for a three-game sweep of the reeling Marlins on Sunday with Taijuan Walker on the mound.

After scuffling at the plate for seven innings, the Mets gave Carrasco breathing room in the eighth when Francisco Lindor and J.D. Davis each blasted a solo homer to give the Mets a 4-0 lead. Davis’ homer, in a pinch-hitting appearance, came as the Mets are searching on the trade market for a right-handed bat to solidify the DH spot.

The Mets have traded for two lefty bats in the last week-plus to bolster the other half of the DH equation. One of those additions, Tyler Naquin, debuted for the Mets on Saturday in left field and went 0-for-4. Daniel Vogelbach started at DH and drew a walk in four plate appearances.

Carrasco’s gem was the latest strong performance by a Mets starting pitcher. Entering play, the Mets had a 2.45 ERA from the starting rotation in July, which ranked second in the major leagues. Chris Bassitt had a rare flat start for the Mets a night earlier, when he allowed four earned runs over six innings.

Jeff McNeil hit a solo homer in the third against rookie Nick Neidert to give the Mets their first run. The homer was the first since June 14 for McNeil, who entered the day with a .162/.240/.191 slash line in July.

The Mets weren’t finished in the inning: Nido, Brandon Nimmo and Lindor all singled. Lindor’s hit extended the Mets’ lead to 2-0 and gave the shortstop 68 RBIs for the season before he reached 69 with his blast later.

Carrasco was challenged in the first inning, when he allowed a single to Miguel Rojas and walk to Jesus Aguilar before retiring JJ Bleday for the final out. In the fourth, Carrasco surrendered a leadoff single, but he escaped the inning when he got Bleday to ground into a double-play.


By: Ny Post

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Career NYC criminal tries to steal moped from NYPD station

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A brazen career criminal with more than 50 arrests on his rap sheet, including rape, was busted for trying to steal a moped from outside a lower Manhattan police station.

Jon Matos was caught red-handed approaching the $1,200 bike outside the 5th Precinct, sources said.

He was allegedly using a set of burglary tools Friday to try to bust the lock of the bike, which was vouchered property, cops and sources said.

Matos, a homeless father of three, was arraigned in Manhattan Criminal Court on charges of attempted grand larceny and possession of burglary tools.

The proceeding was delayed for hours, sources said, after Matos allegedly became angry with a cellmate who used the facilities — but didn’t courtesy flush.

“I was just f–king with it. It’s not my tools,” he allegedly told an NYPD detective, said Manhattan Assistant District Attorney Megan Mers during the court proceeding.

Judge Valentina Morales Saturday agreed to give Matos supervised release in the moped case.

“Thank you, your honor,” Matos told Morales.

But instead of hitting the streets once again, Matos was held on outstanding charges from the 23rd Precinct in an unrelated case, authorities said.

It was his second appearance before a judge in a week: Matos was in court days earlier, charged with grand larceny, petit larceny, and criminal possession of stolen property and was released in yet another incident.

Matos has racked up dozens of busts for burglary, robbery, fare evasion — including the 1999 rape of a 14-year-old girl.

Crime is up in six of the seven major crimes measured by the department contributed to the increase — though the seventh category, murders, dropped a noticeable 31.6% last month in comparison to numbers compiled in June 2021, according to the NYPD’s preliminary statistics.

Grand larceny spiked 41%, robbery rose 36.1% and burglary went up 33.8%.

When addressing the crime spike last month, NYPD Commissioner Keechant Sewell said the department was arresting the same people for crimes “over and over again.”

Other recent and brazen repeat offenders include veteran shoplifter Isaac “Man of Steal” Rodriguez, who was finally locked up in January after dozens of arrests for stealing to support his drug habit.

Laron Mack, whose catchphrase is “I steal for a living,” has been arrested more than 50 times. Another serial stealer, James Connelly, was busted in December for involvement in 28 separate incidents over three months.

Last month, accused serial shoplifter Lorenzo McLucas, 34, was nabbed for stealing from the cosmetics counter at a Duane Reade on Lexington Avenue in Midtown Manhattan, according to cops and court documents.

McLucas, who was released on his own recognizance, has notched 122 prior arrests.


By: Ny Post

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