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The global media are slamming President Biden as a “joke” and an “embarrassment” after the US evacuation of Afghanistan deteriorated into deadly chaos as terrified Afghans clung to military planes in an attempt to flee the Taliban takeover.

Front pages of international newspapers on Tuesday accused a “defiant” Biden of abandoning Afghans following the shocking scenes at Kabul’s international airport a day earlier that left at least seven people dead.

During a national address Monday, Biden rejected blame for chaotic scenes of the bungled withdrawal and the shockingly rapid Taliban conquest.

And the reaction in the international media was swift.

The UK’s Sun newspaper blasted him as “Joke Biden” and declared the president was “humiliated and alone.”

The front page of the Daily telegraph in the UK read: “Biden defends America’s flight. Defiant president faces international backlash as Afghans trying desperately to escape chaos in Kabul.”

The Daily Mail accused Biden of “abandoning” the war-torn country.

“Biden: It’s Afghans’ own fault. As brave translators hide in fear for lives amid scenes of carnage at airport, defiant president washes hands over abandoning nation,” the British newspaper’s front page read.  

Other front pages across the world were filled with the shocking images of Afghans trying to board a US military plane as it taxied down the runway in Kabul.

The Financial Times described it as “absolute chaos,” while the UK’s Metro newspaper branded it “The flight from hell.”

In Canada, the Toronto Sun‘s front page read “Left to die,” alongside an image of women and children crying on the tarmac.

Italy’s La Stampa declared it an “apocalypse.”

The West Australian newspaper used a photo of desperate Afghans trying to climb onto a US plane with the headline, “Our diggers died for this?,” using an Australian term for soldiers.

On home soil, some US media outlets were also critical of Biden.

The Wall Street Journal said Biden washing his hands of the crisis would “go down as one of the most shameful in history by a Commander in Chief at such a moment of American retreat.”

Various CNN commentators declared it a “political disaster” and “willful abandonment.”

A Washington Post editorial was headlined: “The debacle in Afghanistan is the worst kind: Avoidable.”

The reaction came after a defiant commander-in-chief rejected blame for the chaos.

He called the anguish of trapped Afghan civilians “gut-wrenching” and conceded that the Taliban had achieved a much faster takeover of the country than his administration had expected — but stopped short of assuming responsibility for the bedlam.

He instead painted the situation as a binary decision of staying or going — saying he had no second thoughts about his decision to stick by the US commitment, formulated during the Trump administration, to withdraw from Afghanistan and end America’s longest war.

Despite declaring that “the buck stops with me,” Biden placed almost all blame for the shockingly rapid Taliban conquest on the Afghans themselves.

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White House to send more than $300 million in aid to Afghanistan despite Taliban control

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The White House announced plans Tuesday to send more than $308 million in humanitarian assistance to Afghanistan as millions face starvation under the new Taliban government following President Joe Biden’s withdrawal.

The assistance would be given by the United States Agency for International Development through “independent humanitarian organizations” to the Afghan people, National Security Council spokesperson Emily Horne said.

The administration has been criticized for sending aid to Afghanistan previously. Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.) warned that it would be “foolish” and asserted that the Taliban “would take the money.” 

“This brings total U.S. humanitarian aid in Afghanistan and for Afghan refugees in the region to nearly $782 million since October 2021, and we remain the single largest donor of humanitarian aid in Afghanistan,” Horne said, adding that the U.S. has also given 4.3 million COVID-19 doses to the Afghan people.

Assistance will “help provide lifesaving protection and shelter, essential health care, winterization assistance, emergency food aid, water, sanitation, and hygiene services in response to the growing humanitarian needs exacerbated by COVID-19 and healthcare shortages, drought, malnutrition, and the winter season,” Horne said.

China sent assistance to Afghanistan last month to help the nation prepare for winter and build ties between the Chinese Communist Party and the new jihadist government. 

“The United States is committed to supporting the Afghan people and we continue to consider all options available to us,” Horne concluded. “We stand with the people of Afghanistan.”

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ARTICLE: Fort Hood soldier found dead behind barracks

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The soldier was identified as Spc. Maxwell Hockin, who was assigned to 1st Armored Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division. He entered the Army in March 2017 as a combat engineer, Fort Hood officials said Wednesday.

Hockin’s awards and decorations include the Army Good Conduct Medal, Global War on Terrorism Medal, National Defense Service Medal and the Army Service Ribbon, officials said.

Hockin had been at the Texas base since July 2017, where he was assigned to the 91st Engineer Battalion.

Traffic flows through the main gate past a welcome sign, July 9, 2013, in Fort Hood, Texas.

“The entire Saber family is devastated by the loss of our true teammate and friend Specialist Maxwell Hockin,” Lt. Col. Patrick Sullivan, commander, 91st Engineer Battalion, said in a statement Wednesday. “He had an outstanding work ethic, was a mentor to his peers, and was always willing to help out the team. He will truly be missed. Our thoughts and our prayers are with Maxwell’s family during this difficult time.”

See the video:

https://www.kcentv.com/embeds/video/500-c28aef5b-069b-455b-a8a9-4a765fa4a913/iframe

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VIDEOS: How many Americans are still in Afghanistan?

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A good question How many American are still in Afghanistan… those who should know don’t.

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